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Special centre to start monitoring Macao’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Digital technology to be used to monitor eight squares, 22 properties and 72 streets to fine-tune conservation and improve the conservation mechanism.

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Digital technology to be used to monitor eight squares, 22 properties and 72 streets to fine-tune conservation and improve the conservation mechanism.

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UPDATED: 22 Dec 2023, 12:51 am

A special centre to monitor Macao’s UNESCO World Heritage sites will start operating by the end of December.

Cultural Heritage Council Vice President and Cultural Affairs Bureau (IC) President Leong Wai Man said that the centre will be located at the bureau’s Cultural Heritage Department, and is being set up in line with the project designed by the China Academy of Cultural Heritage.

According to Leong, the centre’s monitoring work will be directly conducted by the Cultural Heritage Department, covering 22 properties in the city’s historical area, eight squares and 72 streets.

Leong noted that the centre will collect, analyse, manage and record data on World Heritage buildings, with the aim of applying digital technology to fine-tune conservation and improve the conservation mechanism for Macao’s World Heritage.

According to the Cultural Heritage Department, the monitoring centre will focus on 22 immovable properties by installing external monitoring equipment, including CCTV cameras and settlement gauges inside the buildings.

Leong added that the squares and the streets will be photographed to detect any abnormalities, with the meteorological data from the Macao Meteorological and Geophysical Bureau, travel data from the Macao Government Tourism Office and monitoring data from the Environmental Protection Bureau to be accessed altogether to monitor the sites.

The IC is now following intangible cultural heritage management guidelines, which will regulate the criteria for nominating items for Macao’s intangible cultural heritage list, conservation units, the respective inheritors, as well as their rights and duties.

According to the bureau, the conservation units and the respective inheritors are expected to fulfil their duties and if they fail to do so they will not be penalised but their names would be removed from the intangible heritage list.

In addition, Leong quoted the committee members’ consent on starting the restoration work at one of the buildings that make up Pui Ching Middle School, which was formerly known as the Lou Lim Iok Mansion, due to the deterioration of the building’s façade, roof, ceiling and structure of the immovable property as well as water seepage, taking into account the historical value of the building.

For the old city wall damaged by a landslide in June, the government initiated emergency work to demolish the damaged part of the wall in July. Leong said that the decision was jointly made by several departments, and given that the landslide had entered a residential building at that time and the situation was very dangerous, there was no concern that the demolition would set a precedent. Leong said that the public should not be concerned that the same predicament would automatically apply to other immovable properties, The Macau Post Daily reported. 

 

UPDATED: 22 Dec 2023, 12:51 am

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