Skip to content
Menu
Menu

Government to launch public consultation for the drafting of a plan for the protection of Historic Centre of Macau

The government will launch a two-month public consultation Saturday for the drafting of an official plan for the protection and management of the UNESCO-listed Historic Centre of Macau it was announced at a press conference held Thursday at the Cultural Affairs Bureau (IC).

ARTICLE BY

PUBLISHED

READING TIME

Less than 1 minute Minutes

ARTICLE BY

PUBLISHED

READING TIME

Less than 1 minute Minutes

The government will launch a two-month public consultation Saturday for the drafting of an official plan for the protection and management of the UNESCO-listed Historic Centre of Macau in Praça do Tap Seac.

The public consultation will end on March 20. Four public sessions will be held during the consultation period.

The Historic Centre of Macau was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2005.

According to the Cultural Heritage Protection Law which came into force in March 2014, the protection and management of the Historic Centre of Macau is to be regulated by a plan drafted by the government.

According to the law, the plan is to be drafted in the form of a bylaw (administrative regulation). Addressing the press conference, IC Acting President Kent Ieong Chi Kin pointed out that a public consultation on the framework for the drafting of the management plan was completed at the end of 2014.

According to Ieong, the public consultation this time – the second phase of the matter – would help the government come up with the details of the management plan.

The opinions to be collected during the public consultation period will help form a solid basis for the formulation of the administrative regulation for the protection and management plan, Ieong said.

According to The Macau Post Daily the law states that the government is required to carry out a public consultation process for at least 60 days for the drafting of the protection and management plan.

The law also states that the government has to consult the Cultural Heritage Council on the matter. According to the law, the protection and management plan has to be reviewed for possible amendments every five years.

Send this to a friend