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Jellyfish found at Coloane beaches, government urges public not to swim

Marine and Water Bureau (DSAMA) officials recently found jellyfish at Hac Sa and Cheoc Van beaches during their patrols.

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UPDATED: 22 Dec 2023, 5:43 am

Marine and Water Bureau (DSAMA) officials recently found jellyfish at Hac Sa and Cheoc Van beaches during their patrols.

The bureau has hoisted a yellow flag indicating that the coastal water is “not suitable for swimming” at both beaches, according to a DSAMA statement on Wednesday.

The statement pointed out that the bureau has set up megaphones for taped messages on both beaches to warn citizens and tourists about jellyfish, and lifeguards will also urge beach-goers to refrain from swimming.

The bureau warned the public not to touch jellyfish. Anyone seeing jellyfish should instead inform a lifeguard as soon as possible, the statement advised.

Lifeguards will provide immediate help if anyone feels discomfort after having been stung by a jellyfish, the statement said.

The bureau has strengthened the frequencies of its beach patrols, the statement underlined.

The bureau also advised the public that before visiting the beach they can access the DSAMA official website (https://www.marine.gov.mo) to check pictures updated on a daily basis, in order to better grasp the hygiene and environment situation of the day, the statement said.

The bureau also reminded citizens to pay attention to the colour of the flag, information board, megaphone messages and the situation of the sea when enjoying a day at the beach, the statement said.

And in order to cooperate with the government in fighting the COVID-19 epidemic, also beach-goers should wear facemasks and avoid crowds.

According to the DSAMA website, when the yellow flag is hoisted on a beach it means “not suitable for swimming”, while when the red flag is up it means “do not go into the water”.

According to National Geographic, jellyfish are armed with nematocysts – a capsule containing a barbed, threadlike tube that delivers a paralysing sting. Contact with a jellyfish tentacle can trigger millions of nematocysts to pierce the skin and inject venom.

The effects of stings range from mild discomfort to extreme pain and death. Most jellyfish stings are not deadly, but stings of some box jellyfish, such as the sea wasp, can be lethal.

(The Macau Post Daily/Macau News)
PHOTO © Marine and Water Bureau (DSAMA)

UPDATED: 22 Dec 2023, 5:43 am

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