The Procession of the Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus

While the procession won’t be happening, there will be an online stream available.

Passion Lord Procession Macao
Listed as an Intangible Heritage, the Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus has been celebrated in Macao since 1708. For the past two years, the procession has been put on pause due to the pandemic - All photos by Eduardo Martins

Today marks the annual Procession of the Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus – a Macao Intangible Heritage experience. Taking place on the first weekend of Lent every year since 1708, the two-day event traces the Stations of the Cross from St Augustine’s Church to the Macau Cathedral, then back again the next day

Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus

Usually taking place downtown, the annual Procession of the Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus is celebrated on the first Saturday and Sunday of Lent.

Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus

Bishop Stephen Lee Bun-sang of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Macao has led the annual procession alongside other members of the clergy since being appointed as bishop in 2016.

Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus

The Public Security Police Force Macau usually accompanies the procession, playing a funeral march that reflects the suffering of Jesus before his death.

Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus

The procession follows the 14 Stations of the Cross (also known as the Way of the Cross) – a series of images that depict scenes experienced by Jesus in the final days of his life, as described in the Bible.

Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus

Beginning at St Augustine’s Church, the procession makes its way to the Macau Cathedral (Catedral Igreja da Sé in Portuguese), before retracing the route the following day.

Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus

Listed as an Intangible Heritage, the Passion of Our Lord, the God Jesus has been celebrated in Macao since 1708. For the past two years, the procession has been put on pause due to the pandemic.

Passion Lord Procession Macao

While the procession won’t be happening this year due to Covid-19 measures, the clergy will stream an indoor procession online via their YouTube channel.

Or you can get a feel for what the procession was like before the pandemic by watching this video: