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Macau employees’ level of stress ‘tolerable’: survey

A survey conducted by the Macau Clerical Employees General Association found that the stress that local white-collar workers are under is “bearable” and also that the support of families and friends could help relieve their pressure. The findings of the survey on local workers’ stress were presented in a press conference Wednesday, chaired by the […]

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UPDATED: 22 Dec 2023, 5:53 am

A survey conducted by the Macau Clerical Employees General Association found that the stress that local white-collar workers are under is “bearable” and also that the support of families and friends could help relieve their pressure.

The findings of the survey on local workers’ stress were presented in a press conference Wednesday, chaired by the association’s President Charles Leong Pou U.

The survey sampled 1,160 employees between July 28 and August 22.

The survey cited by The Macau Post Daily asked respondents 10 questions to assess the level of stress they were under. The score of each question ranged from zero (least stressed) to four (most stressed) so that the total score ranged from zero to 40. The findings showed that the score was around 20 out of 40 for all respondents, showing that the stress they were under was tolerable.

The results showed that there was not a large difference of the stress levels for different age groups, with the age group 26 to 35 having a slightly higher level of stress. Leong said that this might be due to the fact that employees in this group are at a critical period of career development. The findings also show that employees at management level had the highest level of pressure compared to other professional groups

According to the results of the survey, the respondents did not think it was difficult to get support from family members and friends when needed. In this segment of the survey, respondents answered 12 questions, with total scores ranging from 12 to 60 (with 60 meaning highest level of support). The findings show that the score was around 40 for all respondents, meaning that they could generally get the support when they asked for it.

In addition, if the respondents found it more easily to get family members’ and friends’ support, their pressure they were under would be less and vice versa.

The results also showed that those who were under more pressure and did not have much support from family and friends were more likely to smoke, drink or gamble.

Leong said this showed that people usually tended to perceive these habits as being able to alleviate their pressure, adding that in reality these habits did not solve the problems.

Leong urged the government to provide more comprehensive mental health services in the public medical system.(macaunews)

UPDATED: 22 Dec 2023, 5:53 am

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