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A massive thermal power plant is near completion in Mozambique

Expected to go online in May, the Temane power station will provide low-cost power to 1.5 million households in Southern Africa.

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ARTICLE BY

PUBLISHED

READING TIME

Less than 1 minute Minutes

Mozambique is set to open its largest gas-fired power plant later this year, boosting domestic electricity generation by 16 percent and fuelling economic growth in the Southern African nation.

The 450 MW Temane Thermal Power Station (CTT) will draw on the plentiful offshore natural gas resources of Inhambane province, where it is located. Once completed, it will provide power to 1.5 million households in Mozambique, as well as to neighbouring Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana and South Africa.

CTT still relies on fossil fuels, which Mozambique has pledged to move away from under an ambitious new energy transition strategy, but the new plant will support a longer-term sustainable energy transition, increasing electricity access and affordability for millions while driving economic growth.

[See more: Mozambique announces an ambitious new energy plan]

The US$650 million project broke ground in March 2022 and is expected to begin operations in May. It was developed through a public-private partnership between South African firms Globeleq and Sasol and Mozambique’s state-owned Electricidade de Moçambique, who share a 25-year concession, after which control of the plant will go to the state.

The US$400 million Temane-Maputo Transmission Project (TTP), which includes the construction of 563-km-long transmission lines along with three new substations, will allow energy generated at CTT to be transported within Mozambique and across the region.

According to Globeleq, TTP and CTT are just the first phase of the interconnection of the southern grid to the central and northern grids of Mozambique. The entire value chain, which also includes gas development, will see an investment of over US$2 billion.

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