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China ends anti-dumping duties on Brazilian poultry

The world’s largest poultry producer attributes Beijing’s welcome move to closer cooperation between Brazilian and Chinese trade officials.

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The Chinese government has not renewed the anti-dumping measures imposed on many Brazilian poultry products since 2019, according to officials at the Brazilian Ministry of Development, Industry, Trade and Services (known by its Portuguese initials MDIC).

The measure, which imposed imposts of up to 34.2 percent, ended on 17 February.  MDIC credited the change to the Brazilian government’s work with Chinese officials in various forums and bilateral cooperation mechanisms last year. 

“The evolution of understanding is due to closer relations that have taken place over the last 12 months,” explained Marcio Elias Rosa, executive secretary of MDIC.

[See more: China fuels record Brazilian agricultural exports]

Anti-dumping duties are tariffs placed on imported goods that are priced significantly below market value in their country of origin, and are intended to protect domestic producers. Although the 2019 imposition of anti-dumping duties on Brazilian poultry exempted more than a dozen companies – provided their sales prices remained above an undisclosed floor price – it nonetheless proved a significant deterrent.  

Brazil is the world’s largest poultry exporter and China is its biggest customer. Last year alone Brazilian poultry exports to China amounted to 679,000 tonnes, valued at more than US$1.9 billion. The end of the anti-dumping tariff, said Rosa, will further increase Brazilian participation in the Chinese market.

The MDIC said the change will make Brazilian poultry exports more competitive, describing it as not only positive for the sector but for Brazil’s wider economic and trade relations with China. 

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